07/01/2015

Evans Should Not Play Professional Football Again

If Ched Evans had accepted the decision his jury made, that he was guilty of rape, by means of continued sexual intercourse and activity with complainant deemed too drunk to have been able to consciously and capably consent to said activity, and if Ched Evans had shown remorse for his victim by means of publicly understanding his crime and apologising for it, and if Ched Evans had condemned his fans unrepentant vilification of his victim, and if Ched Evans were to use his public position to try and raise awareness of the issues surrounding consent, or to use his position to try and provide education on the subject of consent, then maybe yes, I would argue that he potentially could resume a career within professional football.


Firstly, your rebuttal to this is that Evans is appealing his case, and therefore he cannot show remorse as it would completely contradict his apparent belief that he is not guilty. However, just because one believes that one is not guilty, does not equate to one being categorically not guilty. Evans has shown no understanding of the issues of consent throughout this case. While a lack of consent can be clearly expressed through an explicit "no", a lack of consent can also be assumed - for example, when a person is not in a conscious enough state to make a free choice about engaging in sexual inter course. The jury decided that Evans did not have valid reason to believe that the complainant was consenting to the sexual inter course, because of her state of consciousness. It is through these facts, mentioned in the court file (https://www.crimeline.info/case/r-v-ched-evans-chedwyn-evans) that leads me to believe that Evans' determination that he is not guilty stems from a lack of education on consent - were he to be more educated on the subject of consent, it is possible that he would instead, agree that he was guilty.

The victim in this case has had to restart her life five times, due to the relentless breaching of her right to anonymity, at the hands of Evans fans. According to her father, she lives like a prisoner. Yet Evans, and his father in law appear to believe it appropriate that Evans resumes his career which goes hand in hand with a life of wealth, fame and luxury. As I said before, if Evans was remorseful, and was planning on using his position to raise awareness on the issues of rape, then returning to such a lavish and luxurious career / lifestyle may be more accepted by the public.

However, Evans shows no signs of regret, or even human decency towards his victim - not once has he publicly condemned those who continue to destroy his victims life. If Oldham Athletic sign him, Evans will be free to walk into a stadium ringing with cheers, he will be free to receive large quantities of money, and free to sign autographs for fans, despite not being free to leave the country due to the fact that he has not even finished serving his sentence. 

The idea of rehabilitation does not equate to returning to a privileged career after jail time for any human being - any convicted rapist would struggle to resume their previous career; doctors, teachers, managers, lawyers, dentists and swarms of other professions are unlikely to give a convicted rapist their job back, so why should Ched Evans be given his back so quickly and easily? 

Especially given the circumstances of his career? Nobody is suggesting that he never play football again, there are parks all over the country free to use, and nobody is suggesting that he does not work again - there are plenty of jobs that need doing, but what I am suggesting, is that Evans is prevented from resuming a career in a lucrative industry, where come 3pm on Saturday, he walks into a stadium of fans showing their support for the club he is playing for, and his crime is eventually dismissed and forgotten.

Crimes have consequences, convictions have consequences, and consequences continue even when jail time has been served. sequences, and consequences continue even when jail time has been served.

If, and when Ched Evans is either - a) proven innocent through his appeals of his crime, or b) apologises, shows remorse, and wants to use his public platform for good then his return to football will somewhat be accepted. Until either of those days come, I disagree that a convicted, unremorseful rapist resume his career in football.

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